Favourite thing I’ve made…

Day 28 of

#yarnlovechallenge 

and this is the final day!! 

The theme for today is ‘favourite thing I’ve made’.  

Now really…do I have to choose? 

Ok…well just for today this is my favourite hook up,

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100 patch granny

because I adore the colours and that bobble edge border is just sooo super cute, and possibly the most addictive thing ever to hook.  Seriously, it should come with a warning!

xxxxx

 

Routine…

Day 25 of

#yarnlovechallenge 

and it’s still not too late join in. 

The theme for today is ‘routine’.

 100 patch granny
100 patch granny

It has to be having a mug of coffee whilst doing a little hooking…bliss!

xxxxx

Gratitude…

Day 18 of

#yarnlovechallenge 

and it’s still not too late join in. 

The theme for today is ‘gratitude’.

yarnpom
yarnpom

A yarnpom

the perfect way to express gratitude!

xxxxx

Stripes

Day 7 of

#yarnlovechallenge 

it’s not too late join in. 

Theme for today is….

Stripes.

Granny Mabel Tea Cosy...
Granny Mabel Tea Cosy…

This is my Granny Mabel Tea Cosy, click the link for the free pattern. 

I’ve chosen this tea cosy for stripes day, as these slim, pretty stripes sit amongst delicate lace, topped by an array of buttons. 

This tea cosy makes me happy everyday.

xxxxx

 

 

Grandma Mabel Tea Cosy…Free Pattern.

captureThis is the second tea cosy in the Grandma collection, designed with a slight twist on an original theme to keep your teapot well dressed and looking fine.  It is fun and frilly and a little OTT… but that’s what I love…

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Dedicated to the inspiration that was ‘Mabel

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  The pattern makes a tea cosy that fits a standard 4 cup teapot.

I used just under  50g of Stylecraft special dk yarn in colourway duck egg, lipstick, saffron, meadow, candyfloss and cloud.

You will also need approximately 40 buttons in similar colours and of  all different sizes which  were languishing in my button jar.

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Stitches used in this pattern refer to English terminology, however a conversion to US terminology is provided in brackets.

Ch – chain stitch 

slst – slip stitch

dc – double crochet ( single crochet)

dc tog – double crochet together (single crochet together)

You will also need:

a 4mm hook

a darning needle

scraps of yarn to use as temporary tie markers 

a stitch marker 

approximately 120cms of lace about 3cms wide

Top Tip: safety pins make excellent stitch markers! 

Ok, here we go…

Using meadow Ch 80 and join with a slst to form a circle (before completing the slst make sure chain is not twisted).

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It is a good idea to check at this point that the circle of chains fits around your teapot. (see end of pattern for instructions about adjusting pattern).

Row 1: Ch1 (mark with a stitch marker, does not count as a dc), dc in each ch around,

finish with a slst in ch marked with a stitch marker taking care that work is not twisted when completing the slst. (80dc).

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Row 2: Ch1 (remove stitch marker from previous row and place in this ch, does not count as a dc)

Dc in each st around, finishing with a slst in ch marked with a stitch marker. (80 dc).

 

Rows 3: repeat row 2, before joining with a slst in ch marked with st marker  (ie/ when you have the last 2 loops on your hook of the last st of the round – see photo)

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 join the lipstick (red) yarn and finish with a slst as shown below

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Rows 4 – 6: repeat row 2

wp_20161009_21_18_28_proWe are now going to place a tie marker (a temporary mark) to indicate the space for the handle hole.  Before you start the next row, take a small scrap of yarn in a contrasting colour and thread through st marked with the stitch marker. Tie a bow. 

Row 7: Ch1 (remove st marker from previous row and place in this ch, does not count as dc), slst in the same st as the tie marker and in next 4 sts, mark this last slst with a second tie marker. This indicates the space for hole for the handle.

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1dc in next 75sts around to stitch marker.  On 75th dc (last st)change to candyfloss (pink yarn) ie/ when last 2 loops on hook of the last dc as before.  Finish st with pink yarn, slstinto ch marked with st marker (75dc, 5 slst).

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Row 8: Ch 1 (counts as a dc), turn work,  1dc in next 74sts (this row should finish in the st above the st marked with the tie marker in the previous round. 

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Row 9: ch1 (counts as a dc) turn work, dc in next 74sts (75sts in total).  Change to sky blue yarn in last dc. 

Row 10: ch1 (counts as a dc) turn work, dc in next 74 sts (75sts in total). 

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Row 11: Repeat row 9, changing to saffron (yellow yarn) in last dc.  Row 12: (saffron) Repeat row 9. 

Row 13: Repeat row 9, changing to duck egg yarn in last dc. 

Row 14: ch1 (counts as dc), turn work, dc in next 19sts, slst in next 35sts, dcin next 20sts (40dc, 35slst, 75sts in total). 

Row 15: Repeat row 14.

wp_20161023_20_14_35_proRow 16: ch1 (counts as a dc), turn work, dc in next 19sts, dctogin next st (sts 21 and 22), slst in next 31sts, dctog in next st, dcin next 20sts (42dc, 31slst = 73sts in total).

Row 17: ch1 (counts as a dc) turn work, dc in next 20sts, slst in next 31sts, dc in next 21sts (73sts in total). 

Row 18: ch1 (counts as a dc), turn work, dc in next 19sts, dctog in next st (sts 21 and 22), slst in next 29sts, dctog in next st, dc in next 20sts (42dc, 29slst = 71sts in total). 

Row 19: ch1 (counts as a dc), turn work, dc in next 20sts, slst in next 29sts, dc in next 21sts (71sts in total).  It should be starting to look a little something like this…

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Row 20: Ch1 (counts as a dc) turn work, dc in next 19sts dctog in next st (sts 21 & 22), slst in next 27sts, dctog in next st, dc in next 20sts (42dc, 27slst = 69sts). 

Row 21: Ch1  (counts as a dc), turn work, dcin next 20sts, slst in next 27sts, dc in next 21sts (42dc, 27 slst = 69sts). 

Row 22: Ch1 (counts as a dc), turn work, dc in next 19sts, dctog in next st (sts 21 & 22), dctog in next st (sts 23 & 24), dc in next 21sts, dctog in next st, dctog in next st, dc in next 20sts (65sts). 

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Your cosy should be starting to take shape now!

Row 23: Ch1 (counts as a dc), turn, dc in next 19 sts,dctog in next st (sts 21 & 22), dc tog in next st (sts 23 & 24),dc in next 17sts, dctog in next st, dctog in next st, dc in next 20sts  (61sts). 

We return to working in the round in the next row. 

Row 24: Ch1 (counts as a dc) – mark with a st marker, turn, dc in next 2sts, dctog in next st, *dc in next 3sts,dctog in next st*, repeat * -* around, finishing with 1dc in last st, ch3 and slst into st marked with stitch marker.

new pattern coming soon

 Row 25: Ch1 (remove st marker from previous row and place in this ch, counts as a dc), dc in each st around, finishing with a slst in ch marked with stitch marker (52dc). 

Row 26: Ch1 (remove st marker from previous row and place in this ch, counts as a dc), dc in next st, dctog in next st, *dc in next 2 sts, dctog in next st* repeat *-* around, finishing with dctog, slst in ch marked with stitch marker (39dc). 

Row 27: Ch1 (remove st marker from previous row and place in this ch, counts as a dc), dc in each st around, finishing with a slst in ch marked with a stitch marker (39dc). 

Row 28: Ch1 (remove st marker from previous row and place in this ch, counts as a dc), dctoginnext st, *dc in next st, dctog in next st* repeat *-* around, finishing with a dctog, slst in ch marked with a stitch marker (26dc). 

Row 29: Ch1 (remove st marker from previous row and place in this ch, counts as a dc), dc in each st around, finishing with a slst in ch marked with a stitch marker (26dc). 

Row 30: Ch1 (remove st marker from previous row and place in this ch, DOES NOT COUNT AS A DC), *dctog in next st*, repeat *-* around, finishing with a dctog, slst in ch marked with a stitch marker (12dc). 

Row 31: Repeat row 30 (6dc)

wp_20161126_17_14_09_proLeaving a small hole, fasten off and weave in ends.  The little hole allows for the knob of the teapot lid to poke through and helps to keep the cosy positioned on teapot.

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Now hand sew on buttons of all different sizes.

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Next hand sew on the lace with a simple running stitch. 

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I used meadow yarn for the lace at the bottom of the cosy and duck egg yarn for the lace around the buttons.

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Just one last thing left to do now.  Boil the kettle and make a brew…enjoy and admire.

xxxxx

 

A yarny little heart…free pattern.

My hands have been yearning to hook in the evenings lately; but the projects I have on the go at the moment (which have to remain secret at least until after Christmas) are rather more intricate than I dare attempt at such an hour where I am prone to the odd gin and tonic or two as well as a little snooze. 

So whilst creating numerous chains the other evening…see here .  I found myself hooking up a yarny little heart with not a care of the process noted down at all. 

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Fast forward a couple of evenings later when the nest was still and quiet, I found myself unable to sleep, thinking of creative yarny possibilities and my yarny little heart began to trouble me. 

So, I found myself unpicking my heart and writing down the pattern and my world was well again. 

So here is my pattern for a ‘yarny little heart’.

This little heart is a great stash busting hook up as it only requires scraps.

You will need:

scraps of double knit (dk) yarn,

4mmhook,

darning needle to weave in the ends. 

Abbreviations used UK terminology (American terminology in brackets)

Ch – chain,         

slst – slip stitch,           

dc – double crochet (single crochet)               

htr – half treble (half double crochet)

tr – treble (double crochet)              

dtr – double treble crochet ( treble )

wp_20161028_13_32_11_proBegin by chaining 2 (ch2),

slst into first ch to form a tiny ring.

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Ch 1 (counts as a dc), place hook inside of ring

wp_20161028_13_34_08_proand make x9 more dc in ring (10dc in total counting beginning ch). 

wp_20161028_13_37_12_proTurn circle over and give the tail end a firm tug…this should pull the centre of the circle into a more closed position.

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Turn back over.

Row 2:

Ch 2 (counts as a dc,ch1),

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*dc, ch1 in next st*

repeat from * – * in each stitch around.

Slst  in 1st ch

(10dc and 10 ch spaces)

wp_20161028_13_46_37_proRow 3:

Ch4 (counts as a dtr), 1dtr in the next 3 sts,

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1tr in next 4sts,

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1htr in next st, dc in next st,

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ch3,

wp_20161028_13_52_06_proSlst into same space (this creates a picot),

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dc in next st, 1htr in next st,

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1tr in next 4 sts,

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1dtr in next 4 sts, slst in to ch1 of beginning ch4.

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Row 4: ch4 (counts as a dtr),

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work x3dtr in side sts of ch4 of previous row

wp_20161028_14_01_21_pro1tr in next 3 sts, 1htr into the next st, 1dc in next 4sts,

wp_20161028_14_03_38_proSlst in picot space

wp_20161028_14_05_28_proch3, slst in to same space (picot made)

wp_20161028_14_06_53_pro1dc in next 4 sts,1htr in next st, 1tr in next 3 sts

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1dtr in next 4sts,

slst in to  the cleavage of the heart (i’m sure there is a proper name for that…just not sure what it is!!) But if you don’t understand I mean just here

wp_20161028_14_26_09_proTo create hanging loop ch 14

wp_20161028_14_34_51_proand slst in to same space.

Fasten off to finish and weave in ends. 

Repeat until your hearts content

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xxxxx

Grandma Mary Tea Cosy Pattern

captureThis is a very pretty tea cosy, perfect for keeping your teapot dressed in style and your tea hot.  It is the first of a series of tea cosies which make up the Grandma collection.

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Dedicated to the inspiration that was ‘Mary’ the pattern has flowers made on a small flower loom, which are inexpensive to buy and relatively easy to use.  I purchased mine for about £3.

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  The pattern makes a tea cosy that fits a standard 4 cup teapot

I used just under  50g of Rico baby classic dk yarn in colourway (026)

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and scraps of yarn.

  I used scraps of stylecraft special dk in the following colourway (nb/the mint is Stylecraft life dk)

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Stitches used in this pattern refer to English terminology, however a conversion to US terminology is provided in brackets.

Ch – chain stitch 

slst – slip stitch

dc – double crochet ( single crochet)

dc tog – double crochet together (single crochet together)

You will also need:

a small flower loom

a 4mm hook

a darning needle

scraps of yarn to use as temporary tie markers 

scraps of yarn to make flowers 

a string of beads 50cms long

50cms of lace 0.5cms broad

a stitch marker

Top Tip: safety pins make excellent stitch markers! 

Ok, here we go…

Ch 80 and join with a slst to form a circle (before completing the slst make sure chain is not twisted).

WP_20160829_13_15_50_ProIt is a good idea to check at this point that the circle of chains fits around your teapot. (see end of pattern for instructions about adjusting pattern).

Row 1: Ch1 (mark with a stitch marker, does not count as a dc), dc in each ch around

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finish with a slst in ch marked with a stitch marker taking care that work is not twisted when completing the slst. (80dc).

Row 2: Ch1 (remove stitch marker from previous row and place in this ch, does not count as a dc)

WP_20160829_15_08_41_ProDc in each st around, finishing with a slst in ch marked with a stitch marker. (80 dc).

Rows 3 – 5: repeat row 2

WP_20160829_15_45_36_ProRow 6: Ch 1 (remove st marker from previous row and place in this ch, does not count as a dc), 1dc in next 14sts, mark next st with a tie marker (different colour yarn which will be removed later – I just tied a bow in red yarn!) see picture below.

WP_20160831_11_11_30_Proslst in same st as tie marker and in next 6 sts  and mark last slst with a second tie marker as shown in the picture above.  This is where the spout hole starts!

 

1dc in next 33sts, mark next st with a third tie marker, slst in same st as tie marker and in next 4 sts, mark the last slst with a fourth tie marker. This is where the hole for the handle starts!

1dc in next 21 sts, slst in ch marked with a stitch marker. (35dc, 7slst, 33dc, 5slst). Fasten off.

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This next part of the pattern is worked in rows as side (a) and side (b) and forms the sides of the cosy.

So let’s do side (a) first…

Row 7a: Join yarn in st next to the 4th tie marker and to the right hand side of the stitch markerWP_20160831_11_30_09_Pro

ch1 (does not count as a dc), 1dc in next 35 sts to next tie marker, turn.

Row 8a: ch1 (does not count as a dc), 1dc in next 35sts to tie marker, turn.

Rows 9a – 25a: repeat row 8a, fasten off.

WP_20160831_13_15_48_ProOK, now let’s do side (b).  Turn over work and join yarn in st next to  second tie marker on the right as shown.

WP_20160831_13_16_27_ProRow 7b: ch1 (does not count as a dc), 1dc in next 33 sts to next tie marker, turn.

Row 8b: ch1 (does not count as a dc), 1dc in next 33 sts to next tie marker, turn. Rows 9b – 24b: repeat row 8b.

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Row 25b: ch1 (does not count as a dc), 1dc in next 33sts to next tie marker, ch5,

slst into 1st st on row 25a as shown.

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WP_20160902_12_43_31_ProAgain, this is a good point to check the cosies fit on your tea pot.  We return to working in the round again now.

So Row 26: Ch1 (mark with a stitch marker…NB/ this ch does count as a dc), dc in next 34sts, ch7,

WP_20160902_12_50_01_Prodc in next 33sts,

WP_20160902_13_13_20_Prodc in next ch5, slst into ch marked by stitch marker. (80dc).

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Row 27: ch1 (remove stitch marker from previous row and place stitch marker in this ch, counts as a dc), dc in next 34sts, dc in next 7chs

wp_20160906_15_14_56_prodc in next 38sts, slst in ch marked with the stitch marker. (80dc)

wp_20160906_15_39_50_prowp_20160906_15_39_34_proIt is now time to start decreasing the number of stitches to form the top of the cosy.  To do this a dc tog stitch is introduced.  Top Tip: each row that uses dc tog stitches finishes on a dc tog before slst in to ch marked with st marker!  Here we go…

Row 29: ch1 (remove stitch marker from previous row and place in this ch, counts as a dc), dc in next 5sts, dc tog in next st, *dc in next 6sts, dc tog in next st*

repeat * -* around,

finish with a slst in ch marked with stitch marker. (72dc). 

wp_20160909_13_18_43_proRow 30: ch1 (remove stitch marker from previous row and place in this ch, counts as a dc), dc in each st around, finishing with a slst in ch marked with stitch marker. (72dc).

Row 31: ch1 (remove stitch marker from previous row and place in this ch, counts as a dc), dc in next 3 sts, dc tog in next st,  

* dc in next 4 sts, dc tog in next st *, repeat *-* around,

finishing with a slst in ch marked with stitch marker. (60dc).

  Row 32: ch1 (remove stitch marker from previous row and place in this ch, counts as a dc), dc in each st around,

finishing with a slst in ch marked with stitch marker. (60dc).

Row 33: ch1 (remove stitch marker from previous row and place in this ch, counts as a dc), dc in next 2sts, dc tog in next st, * dc in next 3sts, dc tog in next st *, repeat *-* around,

finishing with a slst in ch marked with stitch marker. (48dc).

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Row 34: ch1 (remove stitch marker from previous row and place in this ch, counts as dc),

dc in each st around, finishing with a slst in ch marked with stitch marker. (48dc).

Row 35: ch1 (remove stitch marker from previous row and place in this ch, counts as dc), dc in next st, dc tog in next st,

* dc in next 2 sts, dc tog in next st *, repeat *-* around, finishing with a slst in ch marked with stitch marker. (36dc). 

Row 36: ch1 (remove stitch marker from previous row and place in this ch, counts as dc), dc in each stitch around, finishing with a slst in ch marked with stitch marker. (36dc). 

Row 37: ch1 (remove stitch marker from previous row and place in this ch, counts as dc), dc tog in next st,

* dc in next st, dc tog in next st *

repeat *-* around, finishing with slst in ch marked with stitch marker. (24dc).

wp_20160909_14_58_12_proRow 38: ch1 (remove stitch marker from previous row and place in this ch, counts as dc), dc in each st around, finish by slst into ch marked with stitch marker. (24dc). 

Row 39:ch1 (remove stitch marker from previous row and place in this ch, counts as dc), dc tog in next st,

* dc tog in next st * repeat *-* around, finish with a slst in ch marked by stitch marker. (12dc).

Row 40:repeat row 39 (6dc).

Row 41: repeat row 39 (3dc). Fasten off.

wp_20160909_15_17_19_proYou should have something that resembles the above …now its time to make the flowers!!!

If you don’t know how to make loom flowers they are simple to make.  I highly recommend you watch a tutorial…I found this one excellent…

loom bloom video tutorial

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Make

x8 white / violet flowers

x10 raspberry flowers

x9 pale rose / plum flowers

all flowers to have the same colour centre…I used mint.  Leave long tails on each flower to make attaching them easier.

Keep back x1 raspberry, x1 white, x1 pale rose and x1 plum flower.

Begin to attach the rest of the flowers to the top of the tea cosy using the long tails and  darning needle.

wp_20160918_19_54_15_proContinue around

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 Evenly attaching the flowers…

wp_20160918_20_32_27_proOnce attached turn tea cosy inside out and tie of all loose ends

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Snipping to make tidy.

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 Next, take the lace. Turning the tea cosy inside out tack the lace around the edge of the opening for the spout and the handle.

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Turn, the cosy back to the right side; you should now have a cosy that is beginning to look very pretty indeed…

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Taking the string of beads, thread a darning needle with some raspberry coloured yarn and tie a large knot.

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 Starting at the bottom side of the handle hole pull the needle through from the inside of the cosy to the outside so that the knot cannot be seen.

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Begin to tack between each bead, fixing them in a line around the cosy towards the spout hole.wp_20160924_13_13_06_prowp_20160924_13_15_29_proOnce at the spout hole, snip the beads, turn cosy over and repeat on side b.

wp_20160925_16_57_02_proFinally, attach raspberry coloured flower at the bottom of the handle hole in the space between the beads.

wp_20160925_17_05_30_prowp_20160925_17_08_50_proAttach remaining white, pale rose and plum flower in space between the beads at the bottom of the spout hole. Weave in any remaining loose ends.

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Just one last thing left to do now.  Boil the kettle and make a brew…enjoy and admire.

NB/ TIPS FOR ALTERING THE SIZE OF THE cosy…regularly check the size of the cosy on your teapot.  The body of the cosy has the same amount of stitches as row 1, if yours is more or less than 80sts then keep the number of sts you have up to row 28  in order to create the handle and spout holes, place around your teapot and mark with tie markers as described then count your sts between each marker and substitute your numbers into the pattern.

xxxxx

 

The Grandma Mary Tea Cosy

captureIntroducing the ‘Grandma Mary’ tea cosy…the first in the Grandma Collection

wp_20161002_11_45_37_proDedicated to my Grandma Mary who was a truly inspirational woman.  Born in October 1916 and christened Vera Mary, she grew up in England in the West Midlands and trained as a primary school teacher.  I was privileged to have had her in my life for 34 years before she left this world at the grand old age of 94.  Granny Mary played a huge part in nurturing my creativity as a little girl, teaching me how to make pompoms and to French knit  using a wooden cotton reel and some nails that my Grandad would have made.  She was a gentle and patient woman, who always had a smile and a piece of chocolate.  I once asked her what the best invention of her life time had been and without hesitation she quipped…’washing up liquid!’ 

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Granny Mary worked hard, but always took time to make things pretty… whether that was pansies in the garden, geraniums in the porch, sugar on a peeled apple, a pretty apron whilst doing the housework or a tea cosy for the teapot.   

Prettiness was important because it was the way she cared for people  and her care was a true blessing. 

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So this cosy had to be pretty, in colours that evoke memories of her and of course had to be covered in flowers.

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  The beads at the bottom of the cosy actually belonged to her.  I  have a bag of broken plastic beads that she gave me – she never threw anything away! 

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I am honoured to put them to good use…I think she would be really very pleased with their new use.

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So that is the Grandma Mary tea cosy in all of its glory, here is the pattern linky thing.

xxxxx

Very V blanket tutorial

Thank you for your lovely comments about  my latest blanket off the hook…the ‘Very V’ blanket. 

It really is very simple to hook, so I thought I would put together a little tutorial, as I have not done one for a while and because I have some rare time off on my own.

WP_20160811_20_01_00_ProSo, clearly this is not an original pattern.  I say that from the offset because of copyright and all of that.  Lets be honest…the humble ‘v stitch’ has been around for years.  But this is my tutorial in case you want to have a crack for yourself and you have never done a ‘v stitch’ and you are a visual kinda gal or guy.

Here we go!

Final measurements:  132cms x 120cms / 52″ x47″

I used Stylecraft special dk , for it’s durability, softness and price!  The colorway I used:

Lipstick x 1 ball

Meadow x1 ball 

Saffron x 1 ball 

Violet x 1 ball 

Spice x 1 ball 

Lobelia x 1 ball 

Storm blue x 1 ball 

Cream x 3 balls

You will also need a 4mm hook and a darning needle to weave in those ends! 

Of course if you are using different yarn then you may need to use the recommended hook size for your chosen yarn; and of course you can alter the finished size by hooking more or less chains to start. 

Your hooking tension (we are all different) may also mean you need more or less chains to start with. 

Lets start, are you ready? 

Abbreviations used are below and are English terminology.

Ch = chain stitch 

Chs = chains

Tr = treble stitch (double crochet in US terminology!)

St = stitch 

Slst = slip stitch

Sp = space

Pattern order I used:

Row 1:    Cream                  Row 2: Lobelia                 Row 3: Violet 

Row 4:   Cream                  Row 5:  Storm blue        Row 6: Meadow

Row 7:   Cream                  Row 8:  Saffron                 Row 9:  Spice

Row 10: Cream                 Row 11: Lipstick                 Row 12: Indigo

Row 13: Cream                  Row 14: Violet                   Row 15: Storm blue 

Row 16: Cream                 Row 17: Meadow              Row 18: Saffron

Row 19: Cream                 Row 20: Spice                     Row 21: Lipstick

                                                  Row 22: Cream 

NB/   the first and last row form the edging for the top and bottom of the blanket so use the colour you wish to edge the blanket in, for row 1.

 

Chain 175 in cream

(This gave me about a 1m 15cm /42″ length of Ch.  But any odd number of Chs will work to suit the size blanket you are wishing to hook!).  

2tr in 5th ch from hook, 

WP_20160829_16_53_05_Pro miss a ch, 2tr in next ch

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miss a ch, 2tr in next ch

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 *miss a ch, 2tr in next ch*

Repeat *  –  * across the row. 

Finishing with 1tr in last ch.  Change colour. As shown I change colour by completing half of the process for the last tr (ie/ leave two loops on the hook). Complete last part of tr in new colour as shown.

WP_20160829_16_57_03_Pro WP_20160829_16_58_00_ProI find this makes colour changes more secure.  These ends should be tied to secure further. Top tip! leave the ends long  (approx. 10cms) so that weaving in is easier.

Turn.  Ch3 (counts as 1tr)

WP_20160829_16_59_21_Pro 2tr in the middle of set of tr’s of previous row 

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Continue along the row.

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finishing with 1tr in top of 3rd ch on previous row.

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Change colour. Turn. 

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And that’s it! 

Top Tip!! Weave in the ends every few rows.

Repeat rows 1-22 x5 times.

Then repeat rows 1 – 13 to finish body of blanket. And if you did not adhere to the top tip above…now is the time to weave in those ends!

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I’ve gone all minimalistic for the edging because the blanket itself is simply stunning in this colourway and I did not feel like it needed something fussy to detract from its beauty. 

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This is what I did. 

The first and last row (in cream if you have been following this colourway) form the edging for the top and bottom of this blanket. In cream / your chosen edging colour join in the space at the bottom right of your blanket as shown.

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Ch 3 and slst into the top st of the first tr/ch3 of 1st row.

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Ch1, 2tr in same sp

WP_20160808_21_39_16_Pro2tr in next sp (the sp is the gap between the side of the first sts of each row), 2tr in next sp.

WP_20160808_21_41_39_ProContinue along the edge until you come to the top corner. 2tr in last sp, ch 1, 1tr in same sp.

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Then slst into the top st of the first tr/ch3 of last row as shown. Fasten off.  Repeat for the other side of the blanket.

Finally, in Lobelia (or your chosen colour) join in any st of edge with a slst.

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Slst in each st around edge of blanket. Fasten off and weave in loose ends.  And that is it, you should now have one of these to snuggle under…or reluctantly gift.

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Well done if you got this far. 

I really hope you have found this tutorial easy to follow.  I welcome feedback, so let me know how you got on and if you want to share your picture of your finished make you can in the comment section below. 

I  would love to see what you have made.

xxxxx